Reviews

2017 Nissan Murano Walk Around

The bold nose features Nissan’s so-called V-motion grille. It flares diagonally from the bumper, down to the airdam, up to the hood, and into the boomerang headlamps. A crease flows from the bulging front fenders down and in to the beltline, where the sheetmetal tapers back out to the rear wheels, as if to mimic the flagship Infiniti QX70.

The roof floats over black pillars, supported by the upward swooping windowline that arches back down toward the taillamps, hinting boomerang shape to match the headlamps. The vast majority of crossovers settle for convention at the rear, but the Murano goes for it all. There’s a hint of 1950s Chrysler in there.

Interior

The cabin is less daring than the exterior, but more daring than its rivals, grander and swoopier, with a quiet and refined ambiance. Nissan says it was designed to be a panoramic space, and we can see it. There’s a lot of passenger room and good cargo options. We like the suede-like upholstery in the S and SV models more than the perforated leather (although only the leather is heated). We also like the clean controls with simple interfaces and intuitive buttons, the V-shaped centerstack, the way the dash flows into the front doors, and the low storage bins at the footwells.

The hooded gauges and matte-metallic trim offer a touch of sport. There’s no woodgrain available, but the plastic works for us. All models beyond the S offer a new infotainment system with eight-inch touchscreen, voice recognition for navigation and audio, and SiriusXM Travel Link services for fuel prices, weather, movie listings, stock information, and sports scores.

The driving position is right, the correct height for entry and exit. The low dash will work for shorter drivers, while taller ones will have good headroom, even with the available moonroof. The seats copy what NASA calls neutral posture and Nissan calls Zero Gravity; they’re supposed to reduce fatigue over long hours, by giving more precise support from the pelvis to the chest and in the lumbar. We think you have to try Zero Gravity yourself; not all of us want to be astronauts when we grow up. But we agree among ourselves that the back support is good, while there’s not quite enough thigh support, at least not as much as the Ford Edge and Jeep Grand Cherokee.

The rear outboard seats are among the most comfortable we’ve ever sat in, and that includes luxury cars. They’re the same height as the front seats, so you don’t have to shout upward to talk to people in front. The middle seat isn’t so great. But when it’s empty, given the wide center console, Nissan calls the space conversation alley. And since the rear seat folds flat, the alley could carry a small stack of silent two-by-fours, if you’re willing to rest them on the conveniently low dash.

Request More Info

true true true true true true true true true true true true true true